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20120901
20120930
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. a little bird told me you were paid on the city of los angeles. initially you did not want to do it because you did not want to come to l.a. >> furs, i started acting very young, -- first, i started acting very young, so my ego was three affected by the business and whether or not i got parts, and you are only as good as your class project now, so when i came to los angeles, i used to call it the city of fear, because i was always auditioning and always waiting for the next thing. initially, i also did not want to come to the show, because it was so far away from home. it was a long way away, but i have learned to not just like the city but to love the city. after seven years of trenton -- renting, i bought a house after finishing, which is so outrageous, which is part and parcel of the way we do things. let's do this. it makes no sense, but let's do it anyway. tavis: i am glad you had a great experience. i would hate for you to hate every minute of it. >> i loved it. tavis: when you first started, did you think it was going to resonate with the audience? >> i do not think you can ever know
birdie told me that you were hating on our city of los angeles. >> oh, yeah. [laughter] tavis: that initially you really didn't want to do this because you hated l.a. so much, that you didn't want to come to l.a. from new york city. >> well, let me say two things about that. first of all, i started acting very young, so my ego was very much affected by, you know, this business and whether or not i got parts and you're sort of only as good as your project in a lot of ways. so when i would come out to los angeles, i used to call it the city of fear, honestly, because i was always auditioning and i was always waiting for that next thing and i was always hoping that the movie would do well or whatever. it felt like a one-business town, and in some ways, it is. tavis: some ways it is. >> in some ways it is. so initially i also didn't want to come out and do the show because it was so far away from home. i mean, it is a long way away. but i have learned to not just like the city, but love the city. in fact, after seven years of renting, i bought a house after we finished "the closer
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with a noted author, benjamin barber. restoring the american economy and the continuing conversation about austerity. this weekend in los angeles, dr. baraber be at the independence day, hoping to solve our shared problems. we are glad you could join us for our conversation with dr. benjamin barber, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: all right, please welcome david barber to the program, the noted author and furious at the center for the philanthropy and civil society at the university of new york. he is also the founder of interdependent state. it celebrates its 10th anniversa
of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles. - i love strawberries! and today we're going to the enchanted garden to pick some! and then we're going to learn how crayons are made at the crayon factory! i'm so glad you're coming with us! be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. hood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you rid
a guitar when i was out for the war, and they knew i liked music, and he was with the los angeles philharmonic, and he was black and could not work anymore. he brought it over and put it on my stomach, and strummed it. feeling the vibrations, what is that? that was it. and the opportunity of boring up in los angeles, where the record industry was starting to get steam. a lot of musicians were coming year, so by the time i was a teenager, there were opportunities. you could make a buck. it turned out that you could support yourself. gas did not cost as much to get to a gig as it does now. blues, jazz, all of these things, so there again, luck was with me. tavis: a little bit of luck, but you have got a lot of talent. and who have you not played with over the years? the stones -- >> thank you, but talent is good if you have enough desire. a friend of mine says it is mostly desire. you want to do it. to push yourself. "i am going to learn the song or this thing on the guitar," and figure out how some guy in the mountains of appalachia or somebody plays this and then maybe to get a ch
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with journalists hedrick smith. the book explores the economic and social amrallies that put the dream out of reach. and what we can learn from auto icon henry ford. that conversation coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: hedrick smith spent more than 25 years at the "the new york times" covering six presidents and callous world conflicts. he is an emmy-winning tv producer. his new text is called "who stole the american dream?" >> i am delighted to be here. >tavis: you argue that the american people are more concerned about the divide between the rich and poor, more concerned about th
pears." ♪ ♪ ♪ tavis: good to have you back on the program. i did not realize that you have lived in los angeles for 30 years. >> when i got lost trying to get to your studio, i should have known better. i drove a couple of different jobs. i drove for another company that was based near the studio. transporting checks at night. everybody has a job. that was my job. to make a living with a guitar for a lot longer. i drove all over l.a., that was my life for a number of years. i'm one point, i was born in kentucky, raised in ohio, but i grew up in california. i felt like i became an adult here. i landed here. i dropped out of ohio state. we did beat you in football. they stole that coach from ohio state. the futures would, over, and a decent -- the hoosiers would come over and a decent team went out the window. i came to the west coast in 1977. there was a great feeling of the remnants of the country rock scene and the eagles were at the apex of their career. linda ronstadt was also. i was drawn by those beacons. it became home. l.a. is infectious. tavis: why not nashville? >> i got there,
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight conversation with wyclef jean. he is out with a new book called "purpose: an immigrant's story." we are glad you joined us. a conversation which wyclef is coming up now. always the right time to do the right thing. by doing the right thing. to completely eliminating hungerwalmart committed $2 billion toas we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. please welcome wyclef jean. he is out with a new book. a good good to have you back. 5 i am good. how are you? >> last time i saw you you were rocking the stage at the aids concert. you killed that thing. >> we created a new two-step. >> that was quite a day. we enjoyed that. you started this book talking about the earthquake in haiti. it is interesting to me that you chose to start with that event. good why? >> it was bigger than anything i have ever done to go back to a place in 24 hours and the idea of thousands of people dead on the ground, the idea of kids screaming your voice and you know the
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. low des raise. -- all look at the presidential race. gchris cillizza is out with a nw book, also iyanla vanzant. er latest project is goncalled "iyanla, fix my life." we are glad you joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. always the right time to do the right thing. by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: chris cillizza is the managing editor at the washington post. he is also the author of a new book. good to have you back from the program. good >> thank you for having me back. tavis: i have not had a chance to talk to you person to person since mr. romney has made his famous comment. let me start with a comment itself and what your read on it is. >> there were a number of stab things for him politically. it was a tape of him speaking to republican donors. he seemed to say an honest attempt to say there are a lot of people who are not go
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with noted law professor and longtime policy advocate peter edelman. a georgetown professor and former clinton administration official. out with a new text about poverty in america. his thoughts on what the growing divide between the haves and have-nots means and why the issue does not have the attention of leaders in washington. a conversation with peter edelman coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: peter edelman is the founder and director of the center on poverty, inequality and public policy at georgetown and a former assistant secretary at the department of health and human services. he's also a noted author whose latest text is called "so rich, so poor: why it's so hard to end poverty in america," and i am honored to
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. knight, a conversation with oscar-winning filmmaker jonathan demme. he is out this month with a new project about neil young. in september, he is releasing another documentary, this colony -- this one about post a katrina new orleans. the film is based on a series with premier called "right to return." that conversation, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it is the cornerstone we all know. it is not just a street, but the place where an walmart stance with your community. -- stands with your community. >> and a contribution from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: always pleased to welcome jonathan demme to this program. the oscar-winning filmmaker has not one but two projects out soon, the first, a rare look at the life of rock icon, neil young. the new film is called "neil young journeys" and opens in theaters june 29. so here now a scene from "neil young journeys." ♪ ♪ >> that used to be the mill where i would catch fish when i was 5 years old, or whatever. this is a tow
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with actor keanu reeves, the star of many films, including "the matrix" trilogy, and hank -- he has a new documentary about filmmaking called "side by side,"which compares moviemaking now to the more traditional art form. and he has his directing debut. a conversation with keanu reeves comes up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. you. thank you. -- and by contributions by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome "-- keanu reeves to this program, the star of many programs, including, of course, "the matrix" trilogy, which is out now with a terrific new documentary about the changing nature of filmmaking. the project is called "side by side." he serves as both producer and narrator. he are s
of the month. but the big news this week was clearly on wednesday in los angeles his signing of his pension, public pension reform bill. this is something that a lot of californians think is a longtime coming. probably just as many californians think is still not fully addressed. even the governor should tell us he does not believe this solves all of our unfunded liabilities going forward but it was the best deal he could get right now and he did not want to let the perfect be the enemy of good. he basically said he had one side that doesn't know how to say no and another side that doesn't know how to say yes. he's in between trying -- >> he plays the cards. >> he plays the cards he's dealt. a great interview. this pension bill basically requires public employees hire starting next year will have to work longer before they can retire with full benefits. caps benefits for the highest earners at $3200 in annual payout. it requires employees eventually pay about half -- at least half of the contribution toward their retirement plan. local government labor unions will have a five-year window to
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with the founder and president of the huffington media group, arianna huffington. now the democrats have a tricky task of convincing people to reelect president obama despite economical problems. also we remember michael duncan, gone too soon at the age of 54. we are glad you joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> please welcome arianna huffington back to this program. she is the founder of huffington opposed media group. she is also behind chateau convention, a nonpartisan alternative to the major conventions, focusing on poverty, influence of money and politics, and the war on drugs. she joins us from charlotte. good to have you on the program. let me start by
los angeles times," laura meckler of "the wall street journal," and david sanger of the new york "times." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill". produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- -- >> we know why we're here. to charty greener path in the air and in our factories. to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875, we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management, from real estate to retirement solutions, we've developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still. and that's one thing that will never change. prudential. >> add
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with oscar-winners jeremy irons, out today with a new project called "the words." in addition to that, he has completed more programming. we are glad you could join us for our conversation with actor jeremy irons, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeremy irons to the program, the oscar- winning actor which is out with a new program. it is called "the words," where one author plagiarizes another author's work. here is a scene from "the words." >> i read your book. i like it, very, very much. >> thank you. i really do appreciate it. >> i know, i know. artists always feel uncomfortable talk
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight the conversation with the former secretary of labor, robert reich. he talks about the two-party agenda and what they must do it if they win in november. he is out with a new book called "beyond how to arrange -- beyond outrage here " we are glad you joined us. >> there is a saying king had that said there is right thing. by doing the right thing. to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> robert reich is now a professor at uc-berkeley his latest book is called "beyond outrage." he joins us from berkeley pier reagan >> thank you for having me. >> on friday of this week we expect jobs numbers to come out. next wave we are waiting for official poverty numbers to be released. there is a link between poverty and joblessness, but what is your sense of what the nation ought to expect with jobs numbers and poverty numbers on to
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. a conversation with tony danza. he is out with a new book about his experiences as a 10th grade english teacher. in 2009, he began a stint as a teacher at philadelphia's largest public high school. we're glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome tony danza back to this program. he embarked on a unique journey when he decided to teach 10th grade english in philadelphia. that experience served as the basis for a series. it also inspired a new book, "i'd like to apologize to every teacher i ever had." good to have you back on this program. what are you apologizing for? >> i apologize for not b
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with one of the most popular and prolific actors of our time, richard gere. his projects included pretty woman, an officer and gentleman, and chicago. a new movie called arbitraged, he is also a tireless human rights advocate. we glide your joining us for a conversation with richard gere. >> there is a saying that dr. king had, he said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome richard gere to this program, the tireless human-rights advocate. the story of a troubled hedge fund manager, here is a scene from arbitrage. >> everybody wins if we sell the company. if i live for you. >> you did not know about it, that is why did not
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with author and activist jamie lee curtis. her latest book is out this month and is called "my brave year of first." we're glad you joined us for a conversation with jamie lee curtis. >> there is a saying that dr. king had, he said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jamie lee curtis back to this program, the award winning actor and best selling author is out with her latest, my brave year of first. i love that title. but that is not a buck. >> you know what? this is taunting me. this is actually a certifiable taunting. tavis: james taylor and tavis smiley. >> i'm surprised that you are not making out. i know why you're m
tavis: good evening. smiley. -- i am tavis smiley from los angeles. tonight, salman rushdie. his book is called "joseph anton," which was his book name. that is coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome salman rushdie that to the program. there was a fatwa placed against him following his release of "the satanic verses." welcome back to the program. are you all right? let me start with a quote from this book. the book, i should mention, is written in third person. but this is from the book. to hide in this way is to be stripped of all self-respect. to be told to hide was a humiliation. maybe he thought to live like this would be worse than death. in his book
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with penny marshall. she is out this month with a critical acclaim memoir called uts.other was no we are glad to have joined us. a conversation with penny marshall, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: i am pleased to welcome any martial back to this program. she has written a funny memoir about her life and career entitled "my mother was nouts." at herake up look back life in jail. >> it very, very good. -- about her life in film. >> there are no holes. thanks. ♪ >> are you crying? >> no. >> are you crying? are you crying? there is no crying. there is no crying in baseball. ♪ tavis: you look at one of th
only after years of difficult negotiations. in los angeles, the union and school district officials are now in talks over how to implement a new teacher evaluation system. for for the record, we invited mayor emanuel to appear on the program and roy roamer who served as superintendent of los angeles unified school district twr 2001 to 2006 and before that as governor of colorado. he's currently senior advisor to the college board. randi weingarter, i want to start with you. when you look at the chicago strike -- and i know you're out there now in chicago -- what are the one or two more most important issues that you find resonating at the national level that affect teachers everywhere. >> it's really about saving the heart and soul of public education for all kids who need public education. and when you're on the streets talking to teachers, they are determined to have the tools they need to help kids and for kids to have the resources they need to succeed. and what struck me -- no pun intended -- was how resolute teachers are and para-professionals are about "this is a fight to ens
in the making of the film. >> brown: rebecca keegan of the "los angeles times," thank you so much. >> thank you. >> woodruff: coming up, we'll look at the middle east after the 2011 revolutions. also ahead, new moves to jumpstart the economy: micro- loans for american entrepreneurs; and campaign messages via social media. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: republican presidential nominee mitt romney shifted today from direct criticism of presisint obama over the embassy attacks. omney hahacharged d esday that the administration was slow at first to condemn the violence. today, in fairfax, virginia, he offered a more general criticism of the president's leadership in foreign affairs. >> as we watch the world today, sometimes it seems that we're at the mercy of events instead of shaping events and a strong america is essential to shape events and a strong america, by the way, depends on a strong military. the world needs american leadership. the middle east needs american leadership and i intend to be a president that provides the leadership that americ
." for more, we turn to ken dilanian, who covers national security for the "los angeles times." >> ken, welcome to the program. so what's behind this decision on eric holder's part. >> well, a lot about this remains secret. this is a secret investigation of a classified operation. but what we know is that the justice department is saying they just couldn't make a case here, they're not say nothing crime was committed. and the other thing that it's important to understand about this is that these cases were not part of the enhanced interrogation technique program that the cia carried out. that conduct had already been investigated, no charges were filed. and holder had decided he wasn't going to hold anyone accountable for things they did pursuant to justice department leg opinion. so these were two cases in war zones where the allegations were the conduct exceeded the boundaries of what was permissible. >> even under those harsh interrogation techniques about which we heard and debated so much back when they came to light. so when he said the evidence wasn't admissible or there wasn't
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with colin powell. he is a best-selling author with a new book that focuses on life lessons and leadership. we will get his thoughts on a number of subjects in the news, including america's wars abroad, the crisis in syria, and the 2012 presidential race. we are glad you can join us. a conversation with colin powell coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased and honored to welcome colin powell back to this program. the former u.s. secretary of state and decorated four-star general is, of course, a best- selling author whose latest text is called "it worked for me: in life and leadership." he joins us tonight from washington. secretary powell, good to have you back on this program, sir. >> thank you, tavis, good to be with
in los angeles. diane eastabrook, "n.b.r.," chicago. >> susie: new estimates are in, >> susie: new estimates are in, and it looks like this year's holiday selling season will be the strongest for retailers since the great recession took hold. shoppertrek sees overall sales rising 3.3%, it bases those numbers on visits to more than 50,000 stores. >> tom: the major stock indices inches higher as investors and traders wait for the federal reserve's announcement tomorrow if it will do anything more to help the economy. the session for the s&p 500 illustrates the back and forth, with prices dipping mid-morning, and late afternoon, before closing with a small gain. it continues hovering around its post-recession high. volume grew slightly. 661 million shares on the big board. 1.7 billion on the nasdaq. not a lot of volatility among the major stock sectors. with the iphone five debt, the telecom services sector was the biggest gainer, up 0.7%. consumer staples was in the biggest loser, down 0.7%. energy drink company monster beverage was the biggest loser in the s&p 500. the firm has come
in that similar patients in los angeles were spending 60% more time in the hospital. they were having 75% more frequent office visits. and of course, if you're seeing more specialists, by golly, you're going to get a lot more diagnostic tests and minor procedures. that led to the question of are they getting much better health outcomes as a consequence of all this extra time in the hospital and all the additional procedures? and we found that they were not. feinberg: i would put our quality rankings against anybody, 'cause to me i think the most important quality ranking is patient satisfaction. if we look at that measure, we're the number one academic medical center in the united states. fisher: ucla is a very high-quality hospital, and i'd want to be taken care of there if i had an acute catastrophe. but they also provide a lot of care that i believe is unnecessary. i'm certain that we provide care, not intentionally, that isn't needed, and we have to work on decreasing those inefficiencies that don't add value to care. [siren wailing] fisher: the secret to places like intermountain healthca
for him, then abramoff was fine. >> abramoff had gone home to los angeles, but returned to washington to work for a prominent firm, which announced his hiring by touting the lobbyist's ties to the republican national committee, the new leaders of the house, newt gingrich and tom delay, and the christian coalition now headed by his buddy ralph reed. but no one was more indispensable to abramoff than norquist. >> if it wasn't for his relation with grover norquist, jack abramoff would never have been able to become the super lobbyist that he came. and to charge the huge rates that he charged because he had this unique relationship with certain republican leaders. >> the hefty fees would enrich abramoff, who in turn would direct his clients to enrich the right-wing's political machine. one of those clients was the wealthiest gambling tribe in america, the mississippi choctaw. to keep their huge casino earnings from being taxed, the tribe needed help in washington. so abramoff turned to norquist, who had just what the tribe was looking for distributi-- an org dedicated to opposing all tax
with the mayor of los angeles antonio villaraigosa, the chairman of the democratic national convention and co-chair of president obama's re-election campaign. i'm pleased to have him on this program again. >> it's great to be on the show with you, again. so if the republicans felt that their mission was to define mitt romney, and somehow give the story of why people who voted for president obama in 2008 should vote now for governor romney if that was their mission, what is the democrat's mission? >> i think our mission is to tell the story that we're better off today than when president obama was elected. we're better off because as you remember, we lost 800,000 jobs the month before he got sworn in. they lost 3.5 million jobs, six months going into that. he's had 29 consecutive months of a growing private sector job creation, about four and a half million jobs. we're better off today because he said he would get us out of the war in iraq and he has. he's beginning to the withdrawal from afghanistan. we're better off today because 32 million people have health care that didn't have it before.
. >> the path we offer may be harder, but it los angeles to a better place, and i'm asking you to choose that future. i'm asking you to rally around a set of goals for your country, goals in manufacturing, energy, education, national security, and the deficit. real achievable plans that will lead to new jobs, more opportunity, and rebuild this economy on a stronger foundation. that's what we can do in the next four years, and that is why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. ( cheers and applause ) >> brown: the president was, of course, speaking both to loyal democrats in the hall, and to those voters around the country who haven't yet made up their minds, especially those in battleground states. one of those states is virginia, which the latest election polls show remains a tossup. traditionally red, it turned blue, voting for president obama in 2008 with a big boost from northern virginians. margaret warner sat down with six undecided voters there after watching the president's address. >> warner: this same group sat down with ray suarez raft week to assess
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)